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statement from ACT CSD on NDIS freeze

Please attribute the following to Community Services Directorate Director-General Michael De’Ath 

It was recently brought to the attention of the Community Services Directorate (CSD) that the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) was advising clients that no new planning meetings will be undertaken in the ACT.

CSD took immediate action to clarify the issue with the Commonwealth.

The primary concern for CSD is to ensure all eligible people in the ACT have access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

2000 sufferers shut out of NDIS in the ACT

, Social Affairs reporter

The future of the $22 billion Nation­al Disability Insurance Scheme has been thrown into ­crisis after as many as 2000 people with serious mental health conditions and disabilities were shut out of the program in the ACT, the first jurisdiction to fully adopt the new model.

The territory scheme reached its “target” of 5075 clients within hours of full rollout on September 30. Newly eligible people have been turned away and told to wait for a vacancy, which is typically only available when someone in the NDIS dies.

The ACT is a test case for what experts say is likely to happen when the scheme in other states reaches maturity in 2019-20.

Mr Barr MLA: NDIA freeze on new participants in the ACT

The following is an brief exchange of emails between Bob Buckley and Andrew Barr MLA ... very soon before the 2016 ACT election.


Thank you for your very quick response. I hope you are right.

In South Australia, the NDIA stopped accepting new clients during their trial ... while we were told the scheme was meant to be uncapped, that turned out to be false.

regards
Bob Buckley

On 13/10/2016 9:16 PM, BARR wrote:

Mr Buckley

 

How Shakespeare may help children with autism improve their social skills

Could Shakespeare help children with autism improve their social skills? A new study of a drama-based intervention suggests that this may well be the case.

Researchers from Ohio State University found that a novel method using Shakespeare's The Tempest – which combines recitation of The Bard's language with physical gestures – lead to improvements in communication skills and recognition of facial expressions, in young people with autism.

endorsed letter: NDIA and challenging behaviour

From: Karna

Dear Mr Bowen

With the NDIS rolling out nationwide it is time for the NDIA and its parent policy agency, Dept. of Social Services to start making policy on a number of disability issues such as that of people with autism spectrum disorder and challenging behaviours such as aggression. These people are a large portion of your clients mainly in tier 3 and fall often into the too hard basket due to high support needs and very difficult behaviour. They are the clients most NGOs and other providers do not want as they are expensive and a hazard at times to staff and other clients. I have a son myself who at times falls into this group and am well aware of other “informal supports “doing it very tough with such adult or adolescent children usually males. ...

ASD advocacy in the ACT is still alive and strong

Recently, Marymead distributed a message that said:

Autism sector advocacy - Camilla had spoken to Jon Martin from the Australian Autism Alliance, who informed that there there is now little representation on the Alliance of local peak bodies in ACT. He suggested speaking with the ICAN Network or the Autism Self Advocacy Network. It would be difficult to set up a peak body, as NDIS does not pay for sector-wide advocacy, and it is not funded by government. As the Autism Alliance is in its infancy stage, it is unable to support the establishment of an ACT peak body at this stage. Discussions were held about exploring options for an existing NSW peak body to expand its coverage to extend to the ACT.

The implied demise of SOfASD and ASD advocacy in the ACT are premature. The ASD community in the ACT can remain confident in representation from Speaking Out for Autism Spectrum Disorder (SOfASD), their existing well established systemic advocacy representatives. SOfASD continues to be a strong voice for autistic people and people living with ASD in the ACT (BTW there is no "NSW peak body" for ASD advocacy, particularly for systemic advocacy).

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